Robert T. Wood
Metropolitan Police Officer
Honolulu Police Department


Summary of Police Service
HONOLULU POLICE DEPARTMENT
February 1969 - August 1984

General Job Description
Planned and conducted investigations relating to alleged or suspected violations of state statutes and city and county ordinances.  Duties included obtaining physical and documentary evidence; interviewing witnesses; interrogating suspects; preparing, obtaining, and serving warrants of arrests, and search and seizure; seizing contraband, equipment and vehicles; examining files and records; maintaining surveillance; performing undercover investigations; preparing investigative reports; testifying in hearings and trails; and assisting in the prosecution of criminal court cases. Duties required that a firearm be carried at all times and be proficient in its use as well as the use of the 12-gauge shotgun, AR-15 rifle, and hand-held tear gas cannon.  Duties also included working with the community: promoting various public awareness programs through public contact and public speaking engagements.

Duty Assignments
02/17/69 to 02/15/70: Metropolitan Police Officer I
Police Recruit, Honolulu Police Department Training
Following 16 weeks of police recruit school, was assigned as a foot patrolman in the downtown Honolulu and Waikiki areas.
Following six-months of foot patrol, assigned as a motor patrol trainee and patrolled a daily assigned beat performing duties delineated in the General Job Description as well as any other duties incumbent of a police officer.

02/15/70 to 10/01/70: Metropolitan Police Officer I
Airport Division, Honolulu International Airport

10/01/70 to 03/31/71: Metropolitan Police Officer I
Communications Division
Duties included taking telephone complaints from citizens, and police radio dispatcher (Radio Telephone Operator) (RTO).  Besides operating a radio telephone, duties required operating a computer terminal for accessing information and making computer entries, and operating Civil Defense monitors and teletype.

04/01/71 to 05/31/75: Metropolitan Police Officer II
Promoted to motor patrolman, Metro Police Officer II, and assigned to the Patrol Division, Honolulu area
Duties included those described in the General Job Description (above) and any other duties that may have required the services of a police officer, such as traffic enforcement, traffic control, motor vehicle accident investigation, etc.

06/01/75 to 04/30/76: Metropolitan Police Officer II
Follow-up Section, Records and Identification Division
Duties included the following:
- Reviewing police reports for accuracy in procedures, classification, and scoring according to Uniform Crime Reporting procedures.
- Processing legal documents.
- Firearms registration.
- Microfilm retrieval of police reports and information.
- On-line computer entry of police information and retrieval of computerized information.

05/01/76 to 08/31/76: Metropolitan Police Detective
Identification Bureau, Records and Identification Division, Crime Scene Investigator
Investigated felony crimes such as murder, rape, robbery, and major burglary
Duties included the following:
- Crime scene preservation.
- Photographing and diagramming major crime scenes.
- Photographing, preserving, and collecting evidence.
- Preparation of crime scene investigations for court presentation.
- Testifying in court hearings and trials, to include testimony on the validity of evidence and chain of custody.

09/01/76 to 10/15/80: Metropolitan Police Sergeant
In charge of the Follow-up Section, Records and Identification Division
Duties included the following:
- Supervision of 12 Police Reports Reviewers.
- Overseeing the entire operation of processing of police reports to ensure they were handled in accordance to departmental procedures and classified and scored in conformance to FBI Uniform Crime Reporting procedures.
- Processing of legal documents: warrants of arrests, penal summonses, subpoenas, and restraining orders.
- Firearms registration.
- Preparation of criminal court arraignments.
- In-service training and preparation of performance evaluations for subordinate personnel.
• During the first five months of this assignment, I was responsible for eliminating a backlog of over 100,000 police reports to be processed (a backlog which I inherited with the job); a task which was estimated by the administration to take two and one-half years, using unlimited overtime.  I accomplished this task in four-and-a-half months using minimum overtime by completely reorganizing the operation and through more efficient utilization of manpower and resources.
• This and other accomplishments earned me the nomination and selection of Policeman of the Year, and City and County Employee of the Year in 1979.

10/16/80 to 07/31/83: Metropolitan Police Sergeant
Field supervisor assigned to the Waikiki area
Supervised six to 12 metropolitan police officers.  Supervisory duties included crime scene supervision; supervision of police report writing procedures to ensure accuracy in collecting and assembling pertinent facts, ability to prepare clear and concise reports, and ability to properly classify criminal offenses in conformance with FBI Uniform Crime Reporting procedures.
Further duties included investigations of personnel complaints against police officers.
In addition, I was responsible for providing in-service training and preparation of performance evaluations for subordinate officers.

08/01/83 to 08/12/84: Metropolitan Police Sergeant
Staff supervisor assigned to the Community Relations Division
Responsible for the logistical needs of the division as the office operations supervisor, which included supervision of the secretarial staff, police cadets, and police officers assigned to the division.  Assisted with the coordination of programs in outer districts of HPD.  Also responsible for the planning and coordination of banquets, seminars, and Police Week activities.

Directly responsible for the following activities and programs:
- Awards System -- for police officers as well as citizen awards.
- Managing Editor for the department newspaper, "The Blue Light"; responsible for production, editing, and publishing.
- HPD public information brochures
   -- responsible for writing and keeping current over a dozen information brochures for public dissemination to inform citizens of crime preventive safety tips, and of police programs and activities.
- Drug Awareness Program -- supervised the implementation of the D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) Program.
- Supervised the Rape Prevention Program.
- The Deputies Club -- responsible for budget, coordination of programs, and distribution of funds.
- The 200 Club -- responsible for budget, coordination of programs, and distribution of funds.
- Departmental correspondence -- responsible for preparing letters of response.
- In-service training and preparation of performance evaluations for subordinate officers and staff.

Major Accomplishments:
• Interpreter and translator for the Third, United States Japan Conference on Organized Crime, November 28, through December 1, 1983, Honolulu, Hawaii.
• Head of the interpreter pool and simultaneous interpreter for the First, United States Japan Conference on Organized Crime, January 28, through February 1, 1980, Kauai, Hawaii.
• Policeman of the Year, 1979.
• City and County Employee of the Year, 1979.
• Interpreter for a thirteen member Police Delegation headed by Mr. Akira Kato, Chief Superintendent of the Japan National Police Agency visiting the Honolulu Police Department, November 1, 1978.
• Special Liaison between the United States Secret Service and Japanese security agencies, under Honolulu Police Department's Tactical Operations Division, as a bodyguard and interpreter for the visit of Japan's Prime Minister Fukuda, March 1978, Honolulu, Hawaii.
• Special liaison between the United States Secret Service and Japanese security agencies, under Honolulu Police Department's Tactical Operations Division, as a bodyguard and interpreter for the visit of Japan's Emperor Hirohito, November 1975, Honolulu, Hawaii.
• In 1973, I wrote and published "Bridging the Gap: Police - Japanese," a language guide to assist police officers confronted by Japanese tourists.  The language guide was designed for nonverbal communication for the police officer who could not converse in the Japanese language.  The book was created out of a need to assist the many Japanese tourists in Hawaii and the fact that police personnel were not available who could interpret when the need arose.  The book, which went through three editions, was department issue to all HPD police officers since 1973, and was used by hotel security guards and police officers throughout the U.S., Japan, and other countries.

Left Honolulu Police Department in August 1984, to accept a position as a Federal Criminal Investigator, Special Agent, with assignment in Tokyo, Japan.